Gardeners’ plants and curiousity grow

Walking into the greenhouse on a Tuesday  afternoon, students can be seen inspecting delicate buds emerging. This isn’t just a biology project, however. Planting seeds and gardening can seem like a part time job, but for members of the gardening club, the payoff is worth it.

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Located in the greenhouse inside the science offices, the warm, sunny space houses many plants, providing the perfect place to germinate. Fresh scents and green stems make it a welcoming environment for all.

The gardening club has unofficially been a part of the high school for about three years, but last year was the first time it attracted large scale student involvement, according to biology teacher Scott Bohlmann. Over twice as many plants have been grown this year compared to years in the past.

During a typical meeting, students check in on their plants’ growth. If the plants have germinated, they are moved to larger containers to sell in the future. Students work to water and replant the plants if necessary. Clean up is also a big part, since soil is a welcomed factor in the greenhouse. The greenhouse is open throughout the day and students often come in to check on their plants during their free periods.

Flowering plants have been started, but the majority of the plants are vegetables like tomatoes, peas, lettuce, peppers and beans. The club’s advisers — teachers Susan Considine, Ethan Weichmann and Bohlmann hope to sell remaining plants at the end of the year. Plants that are not sold will most likely be cared for over the summer by the teachers.

Anyone interested in gardening and cultivating plants is welcome to join the club. Primary meetings are on Tuesdays after school, but it could take some time to see results. “It is important to realize that the process requires some commitment as the plants don’t mature overnight,” Bohlmann said.

Class of 2014

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